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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> embroiled in an embarrassing spy scandal, president obama may order the n.s.a. to stop eaves dropping on the leaders of american allies, stripping the agency of some of its powers. >> a pakistan. >> i family that lost their grandmother to a drone strike is on capitol hill to tell their story. first, they share it with aljazeera america. >> sex crimes on campus, surprising new research that the majority of attacks on campus of committed by repeat offenders. >> it's hard breaking. >> it was heart wrenching. >> one year after hurricane sandy, some families still have not been able to pic pick up the pieces. why an insurance loophole is preventing some from rebuilding their storm-ravaged homes. >> good morning. welcome to august america. it's great to have you with us. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm thomas day den. the national security agency is now under fire here at home. >> both the president and congress are considering changes that would limit the n.s.a.'s sweeping ability to collect intelligence. >> words like constraint, transparency and increased oversight are now used when ta
' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizens. calls in the country in the space of a month. >> we need to figure out why this kind of activity is happening and what kind of trust needs to be rebuilt. in the end we're fighting a battle in terms of security and
an intelligence apparatus . the direction of national intelligence, and nsa director both set to testify about u.s. spying allegations from brazil to germany. randall pinkston joins us live on capital hill, and randall they said trust has to be in their words rebuilt between the u.s. and its allies. are stepping being taken to do that? >> given all of the issues right now, the administration certainly did not need the headache of having it revealed that the u.s. has been spying on some of its top allies. they are meeting with the nsa director, keith alexander who will be testifying later today on intelligence. they will be grilled, both of them, alexander as well as james clapper on the extent of america's spying operations and there will also be the introduction of legislation to scale back to modify the patriot act. this legislation will be introduced by the author of the patriot act, and among other things it will put restrictions on the gathering of metadata, as well as refining the extent to which america can engage in foreign intelligence, and presumably that will take into account spying
acknowledging more constraints are needed and he is being criticized over the nsa tapped angela merkel's phone and snooped on other european allies and we have more. >> reporter: the practice of listening in on the phone calls of the leaders of allied countries could be about to end. in an interview president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose, to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean it's what they should be doing. this is prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor merkel's known in 2010. administration officials say it's not true and a white house review only discovered the surveillance of world leaders in the summer and say the bugging of merkel's phone and soon after. a delegation from the european parliament visiting washington is worried about the surveillance of 10s of millions of its citizens and one report from spain suggests the nsa tracked 60 million calls in the country in the space of a
you about afghanistan. but i want to start with the dustup over the n.s.a. allegedr our, you know, espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? pretty muchit is acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if haven't acknowledged it? anyway. about angelament merkel is that the united states is not and will not be in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the would have been the intelligence assessments. saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country. but you don't know that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. the source is -- they don't describe in the reports that we get that so and so's phone was -- conversa
to have that level playing field if we're going to succeed. >> does, do the geopolitical tensions over nsa stuff, is that damaging to the prospects of a t-tip agreement? >> look, it is obviously a serious issue that is out there. our view is that these issues are to be kept on separate tracks, in the right lanes of dialogue between officials on both sides. you have heard from a number of europeans that they see the logic of moving ahead with t- tip. it is important to their growth strategy to tighter -- to try to maintain competitiveness. we are hopeful we will continue to make progress on that. we have teams in brussels. there are negotiations that had to be canceled during the shutdown of the government but are back on track. we expect to continue those discussions in the coming weeks. >> a number of people have mentioned regulatory alignment, in autos. can you give us more detail of what that means in practice? if you are bmw, what are the challenges of having different regulatory regimes on both sides of the atlantic? >> one is obvious the crash testing. cars have to be crash tested in
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell: the real damage of leaking that document was that certainly they could focus their counter-intelligence efforts on those places where we're being successful and not have to worry as much about those places where we
in the same time frame. watch sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> this is a tough time for n.s.a. where everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the n.s.a. surveillance program. this morning at 10 eastern. live sunday on c-span 2 your calls and comments for kitty kelley, best selling author of unauthorized buying fiss of jackie e, nancy reagan, the bush family. on c-span 3 remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of his november 1963 asass pace in. last week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to afghanistan and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman talked about
the last piece of week or two, u.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies u.s.nsa is outside the and is not governed by statutes. it is governed partially by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those reduction provide any -- any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated and he is right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and their allies safe. and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in new york and other parts of the world to make sure -- in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. we can do certain things is not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what is the benefit we are receiving and what a
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
- called nsa spying concerns. do you have an update, and do you think these meetings have improve relations between the u.s. and the eu? >> there's no question that the kind of communication we have had with the european allies have been very important and very useful when it comes to making clear how much we value the kind of security cooperation that our nations have and that we have with europe in general. comes toal when it keeping americans safe, when it comes to keeping our european allies safe. there are the tensions that of been caused by these disclosures are ones that we knowledge and ones that we are addressing directly in our communications with european nations and other nations who have been part of the disclosures. >> [indiscernible] >> i would not speak for any european nation or any other allied nation, but we believe the kind of medication that we have engaged in has been effective and useful in making we value those relationships, how important our cooperation is when it comes to national security issues and intelligence matters and how much more broad our relations veryb
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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